Even frozen Antarctica is being walloped by climate extremes, scientists find

In recent years, Antarctica has experienced a number of extreme weather events, including record-breaking high temperatures, heavy rainfall, and powerful storms.

These events are causing the continent's ice sheets and glaciers to melt at an alarming rate.

If this trend continues, it could have a devastating impact on the global climate.

The loss of Antarctic ice could raise sea levels by several feet, flooding coastal cities around the world.

It could also disrupt ocean currents and weather patterns, leading to more extreme weather events.

The highest temperature ever recorded in Antarctica was 18.3 degrees Celsius (64.9 degrees Fahrenheit), which was recorded in the Esperanza Base in 2020.

The average sea ice extent in Antarctica has decreased by about 1.5 million square kilometers (580,000 square miles) since 1979.

The Thwaites Glacier, one of the largest glaciers in Antarctica, is melting at an alarming rate. If it collapses, it could raise sea levels by up to 10 feet.

Climate change is not the only factor that is causing the melting of Antarctic ice. Other factors include natural variability and the ozone hole.

Climate change is not the only factor that is causing the melting of Antarctic ice. Other factors include natural variability and the ozone hole.